Teleportation: How Might The Brain Handle It

How would the brain handle teleportation, assuming we ever get it to work? Neuroscientists at the University of California, Davis, have taken a shot at answering this question using some specially wired volunteers.


(Neuroscientist Arne Ekstrom uses virtual mazes)

Arne Ekstrom, associate professor at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience, wants to know how we memorize places and routes, and learn to find our way around. Itís long been known that as a rat navigates a maze, its brain gives off a rhythmic oscillation, Ekstrom said. This also happens when humans travel around a virtual landscape on a computer screen. Most models of brain function assume that the oscillations, emanating from the hippocampus deep inside the brain, are at least partly driven by external inputs.

ďThere is this rhythmic firing in the brain during navigation and while remembering things, but we donít know if it is triggered by sensory input or by the learning process,Ē Ekstrom said.

Ekstrom, postdoc Lindsay Vass and graduate student Milagros Copara were able to solve this problem by working with a group of patients being treated at UC Davisí Department of Neurological Surgery. These patients have a severe form of epilepsy, and surgeon and study coauthor Kia Shahlaie implanted electrodes on their brains, inside the skull, to find out where seizure activity begins and identify treatment options.

In between seizures, the electrodes recorded normal brain activity, and three patients volunteered to take part in the experiment. They were asked to navigate through a streetscape on a computer screen. At some points, they entered a teleporter and jumped to a different, known location in the map. During teleportation, the screen went black for a random period of time.

Teleportation did not interrupt the oscillations at all, but the rhythm did change with the distance travelled during teleportation, Ekstrom said.

The results show that these oscillations are driven entirely by memory and learning processes in the brain, and do not depend on external senses. They also show that the oscillation carries information about speed and distance travelled, even when that travel is virtual teleportation.

Teleportation has long been a staple in science fiction. Most often it is a process mediated by technology, early examples include the vibra-transmitter from Into the Meteorite Orbit (1933), by Frank K. Kelly and the Cosmic Express from the story of the same name by Jack Williamson published in 1930.

One of my favorite examples of the idea of DIY teleportation sans machines is Jaunte from The Stars My Destination, the 1956 classic by Alfred Bester. In the novel, the person wishing to Jaunte must have actually been to his destination and must be able to clearly visualize it along with seeing clearly his current location.

Persons with traumatic brain injuries had to relearn the process.

Via UC Davis.

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